Housing

On Campus Housing

Live in a dormitory on the UNM campus. Do not miss this amazing experience! Residence Life and Student Housing offers three different styles of residence hall living: Traditional, Suite style and Apartment style. UNM offers students a variety of types of buildings to live in and each building has something different to offer. Learn more about each hall and find your style.

On-campus, housing, and meal plans are mandatory for all first-year undergraduate students.

 

Visit UNM Housing for more information: https://housing.unm.edu/


Pros & Cons

ProsCons
  • Community; Meeting other students

 

  • Easy access to campus resources and facilities

 

  • Meal Plan options available

 

  • Variety of rooms and living options

 

  • Can be more costly than living off campus

 

  • Additional costs for housing between semester

 

  • Might be loud

 

  • Awarded based on first come first served basis

 

  • Limited move-in dates

Signing/ Move Out Clause

It is very important for you to read the lease, ask questions, and fully understand and agree to the terms before you sign it. Once it is signed, you are responsible for following all of the terms in the lease.

 

You Sign, You're Stuck...at Least Until the Term Is Up

Read the lease or rental agreement carefully before you sign or put money down. Ask about anything you do not understand. Look for hidden charges or penalties. If you sign the lease, you may be stuck paying those charges. If it's not in writing, it's not binding. If something is important to you, get it in writing. Don't count on an oral promise.

 

Move Out Clause

It's important that you read the lease termination section of your lease agreement carefully so you understand the implications of breaking your lease early and your obligation of notice when you choose to move out at the end of a lease term. 

 

Customizing Your Apartment or Space

Painting the walls or installing your own lighting without permission could result in lease termination or loss of your security deposit. If apartment customization is important to you, be sure to discuss it with your potential landlord before signing a lease.

 

Late payment

Please review your lease and make sure you understand the date that your rent is due. If you don't understand, ask questions. You are responsible for paying rent on time according to the terms of your lease agreement. If you fail to pay on time, your landlord will likely charge you a fee for late payment. 

Responsibilities and Security Deposits

 

Damage/Security deposit

Most landlords require that you pay a "damage deposit" or "security deposit" before moving in. This money is intended to cover damage to the property beyond that from typical, ordinary use. We recommend you do a "move-out inspection" at the end of your lease with your landlord.

 

You Could Be Responsible for Damage You Didn't Do

Make sure any preexisting damage the landlord hasn't agreed to fix, such as: stained carpeting, broken blinds or missing tiles in the shower, is written into your lease agreement as "preexisting." Documenting any preexisting damage protects you from losing your security deposit or being charged damage fees when you move out.

Rent

 

Know What's Included

Some rental properties include utilities, cable and parking within the monthly rental cost, while other properties do not.

 

Utilities

Utilities are typically electricity, gas, and water. Many apartment complexes include the price for utilities in your monthly rent. You should talk to your landlord and ask who is responsible for paying the utilities. You may have the option of paying for your utilities separately. You should expect to pay more for gas and electricity in the winter.

 

Can You Customize?

Painting the walls or installing your own lighting without permission could result in lease termination or loss of your security deposit. If apartment customization is important to you, be sure to discuss it with your potential landlord before signing a lease.

Late Payment

Please review your lease and make sure you understand the date that your rent is due. If you do not understand, ask questions. You are responsible for paying rent on time according to the terms of your lease agreement. If you fail to pay on time, your landlord will likely charge you a fee for late payment.

If it is not in writing, it is not binding. If something is important to you, get it in writing. Do not count on an oral promise.

Parking

If you own a car or plan on getting one, you should ask your landlord where you can park. Many apartment complexes offer free parking for their tenants. If not, ask your landlord about parking arrangements in your neighborhood. Parking can be very difficult if you live near UNM. You should not assume that you can legally park on a public street without permission.

For more information about parking on campus visit: https://pats.unm.edu/

Off Campus Housing

Find Housing

Talking with people at UNM (students, the staff at GEO and/or people in your academic department) is one of the best ways to find housing and get an idea of the different types of housing near campus. Another good resource for finding housing is the Internet, e.g. organizations that provide online information on rental listings, neighborhood information (crime rates), and other community insights.

Find a Roomate

Having a compatible roommate that you can trust is essential to a pleasant living experience.

We advise students to choose their roommates carefully. Let your potential roommates know your habits, what is important to you, and your expectations for day-to-day living (cleanliness, security, noise, etc.). Plan and start looking for a roommate as soon as you figure out what your housing situation will be. Also, make sure that you both sign the lease or rental agreement so that you are not the only one responsible for the apartment or house.

Living with roommates is one way to share the expense of housing. International students looking for a roommate are welcome to bring flyers to GEO and post them in the front office. You may also send an email to GEO with a detailed description of your housing situation and your contact information and we will forward it to the international student listserve for other international students to access.

Legal Questions

Legal issues related to housing may come up while you live in your apartment or house.

Law Access New Mexico is a non-profit organization that provides free telephone legal assistance for low-income individuals related to many issues, including housing. They have many housing handouts on their webpage that provide helpful information. Please see their website. They can also be reached by phone at (505) 998-4529 or 1(800) 340-9771. They have interpreters available for many languages if you prefer to communicate in a language other than English.